Long life, no cooling fans: Intel’s 4.5W Core processors could blur the PC/tablet line

Windows tablets hold within them an implicit promise: To deliver the full Windows 8 experience in a svelte tablet form factor.

Unfortunately, the ambitions of Microsoft and its partners have thus far exceeded reality, largely due to processor power issues. Even the lowest of low-wattage Ultrabook chips simply sip too much juice, forcing manufacturers to house their hybrids in cases full of fans—a compromise that has left Windows tablets and convertibles thicker and louder than the ARM-based tablet competition.

No more. Intel announced Tuesday that new Core Y-series Haswell processors capable of fitting in thin, completely fanless designs are inbound “in the coming months.”

While Intel had previously announced its Core Y-series chips would run at a scenario design point—basically, an Intel metric for the power draw during sustained workloads—of 6 watts, the newly announced processors will dip all the way down to 4.5W SDP. (6W variants will also be available.) That 1.5-watt difference between the two is the difference between needing additional cooling and a potentially fanless design, according to Intel

Tablets and hybrid PCs with the 4.5-watt Core chips will offer more than nine hours of battery life on active usage, Intel spokesman Dan Snyder said via email.

Don’t expect to see crazy performance from such low-powered Haswell processors, however.

While the new chips will be able to boost to higher performance for short periods thanks to their 11-watt thermal design power rating—a “worst-case” power metric that measures the maximum energy used during heavy workloads—a large part of Intel’s ability to bring the cooling and power requirements down so far lies in underclocking the processor. Sustained boosting above 4.5W would strain the cooling capabilities of a fanless chassis.

Even still, a low-powered Haswell processor will blow the pants off both ARM chips andIntel’s own Atom CPUs, performance-wise, bringing true Ultrabook-like chops to a truly tablet-style design.

“I think there is a real market need for a fanless tablet or 2-in-1 with PC-level performance,” says Patrick Moorhead, president and principal analyst at Moor Insights and Strategy. “This is exactly where Intel’s new 4.5-watt [chip] comes into play… Even though the 4.5-watt Haswell will be clocked lower than the 6-watt version announced at Computex, it will have significantly higher performance than Bay Trail.”

While Moorhead expects production of low-watt chips to ramp up sometime in 2014, Intel says the first round of energy-sipping Y-series processors will be produced in limited quantities. It’d be a shock if those chips failed to show up in a Haswell refresh of Microsoft’s Surface Pro tablet.

Google Maps Can Detect Traffic Accidents

Jakarta – Google has just updated the Google Maps application with new features. This feature comes reports of traffic accidents and the number of ways to access the various facilities.
Google Maps with accident information can be used on Android and iOS based devices. Overall, this application displays maps and their reliable navigation and traffic information.
Warning about the accident will appear on the map showing traffic flow and road construction. This information is also recommended that these options are not stuck in traffic around the accident site.
Last June, Google bought Waze, the creator of popular apps that inform traffic flow. But Google has not confirmed whether Waze’s data associated with this application or not.
The new application also allows users to find out if the place you want to target viable or not. Features »Explore” display greeting cards enjoy a meal and good night.
Through these features, users can be helped with a variety of information about the place in detail. There is also a rating system that allows users to find somewhere assessment.
Google Maps with navigation devices had previously been released for the Android and iOS platform. Product Manager for Google Maps, Nobuhiro Makida, said the superior feature of this application is the My Location, search, and referrals.
“Through My Location, users can know of its existence through the map, even if the device does not have GPS,” said Makida.
Next is a local search to find a business category. While referrals are the best route to a destination, even if the user is driving, walking, or taking public transportation.
Features can indicate the distance and direction of travel time to get to the destination. The Google Maps Navigation can be run via voice commands.

How Apollo 11′s 1.024MHz guidance computer did a lot with very little

 

early 44 years ago computer hardware was in an entirely different place than it is now. The levels of performance don’t even fit on the same scale. The anniversary of the Apollo 11moon landing is upon us, and those brave space pioneers got by without a 3GHz multi-core CPU. The guidance computer used on the Apollo 11 mission ran at only 1.024 MHz.

The moon landing was the height of technological achievement at the time, and some of the rocket technology is still relevant today. That computer, though, has been left in the dust. In fact, it was well and truly obsolete a few years after the landing.

The Intel 8086 came about roughly ten years after the Apollo landing, marking the beginning of x86. Apollo 11’s computer had 4 registers — essentially slots for holding numeric values. The 8086 boosted that to eight 16-bit registers.

The IBM PC XT ran the next version of that chip, the famous 8088. This computer ran at 4.077MHz, which sounds incredibly slow by today’s standards, but is still four times faster than the Apollo 11computer. The XT also packed in eight times the memory used on Apollo 11.

The Apollo 11 guidance computer actually had some impressive software features for a system that didn’t even run a graphical interface. It could multitask up to 8 different operations, but it didn’t work the way we think of multitasking. Today’s operations use preemptive multitasking that allows the OS to distribute computing resources as needed. On Apollo 11, programs were in charge and had to give control back to the OS periodically. A kind of virtual machine was used to allow developers to mix hardware-level instructions with virtual machine commands within the same assembler code.

Inputting commands required translating the English words into “verb noun pairs,” which could be input as numbers. There was a handy sign in the cabin as a reminder. To top it all off, none of the computer’s systems were software upgradeable. All the code was stored in read-only memory. Several years after Apollo 11, Apollo 14 was forced to manually input the code to patch a system malfunction — it took 90 minutes just to type it in.

Maybe your computer is a little sluggish, and your smartphone is a couple years old, but you have it better than those astronauts

Talk Nokia Lumia Excellence 1020

HELSINKI – 41 megapixel camera is a major advantage presented by Lumia 1020. But Nokia claims that there are many other advantages to selling this smartphone.

Head of Marketing and Sales of Nokia in North America Matt Rothschild, said the camera is not the only advantage Lumia 1020. Hardware elements, including the AMOLED screen to accessories Camera Grip and shutter button, says Rothschild, a smartphone is another advantage.

“On the whole, this is what we refer to as the volume of product.’s (Lumia 1020) is very beautiful to grip, has a good balance, and well designed.’s What we call a consideration” Rothschild said, as quoted from Venture Beat, Monday (15/07/2013).

As for the camera, said Rothschild, Lumia 1020 has a very broad target audience, ranging from the professional to make photography only as a hobby.

“But the most important thing for us is that when we talk to customers, they tell us that they want to have a good picture. Everyone knows that smartphones now include photographic device that can be carried anywhere, so this is the core thing that all people are looking for,” he concluded.

Mozilla ponders blinkers for your browser

Mozilla Labs has outlined an experiment it’s conducting in improving the personalisation web publishers can offer readers who browse their sites using Firefox.

The outfit says it’s been working on the idea since last year, when it “conducted a series of experiments in which a user’s browsing history could be matched with interests in categories like technology, sports and cooking.”

In return for opting in to the trial, lab rats were offered “insight into how they spend time online.”

Mozilla Labs is now wondering “what if these interests were also available for the user to share with the websites they visit to get a better, more personalized browsing experience” so that “content creators and consumers could benefit from Web-based interests”?

Here’s one scenario the outfit has imagined as resulting from this line of thinking:

“For example, let’s say Firefox recognizes within the browser client, without any browsing history leaving my computer, that I’m interested in gadgets, comedy films, hockey and cooking. As I browse around the Web, I could choose when to share those interests with specific websites for a personalized experience. Those websites could then prioritize articles on the latest gadgets and make hockey scores more visible.”

Some publishers have already pressed the API for this kind of thing into service, according to the Mozilla Blog, but the code is not in the wild and is being tested – technically and conceptually – as Mozilla figures out how people will react to websites that dynamically change content based on readers’ past behaviours.

One example of successful personalisation mentioned in the posts announcing the initiative is The Guardian’s offer to ensure its readers see no news about the birth of George Alexander Louis Windsor. That’s a service many will doubtless enjoy. Whether such personalisation can result in readers choosing only to encounter lines of inquiry and opinions they already agree with, and therefore deciding to consume media that re-enforces their feelings rather than offering broader perspectives, is a wider debate for another day. Or the comments.